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Dawn Wright's Blog

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My colleagues and I are pleased to share the lineup of Esri short courses and presentations to be presented this April at the European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2017 in Vienna, Austria. Many know of EGU as the premier Earth, space, and planetary sciences scholarly organization of Europe, with over 12,500 members from around the world. It is a sister organization of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). EGU's annual assembly is the largest, most prominent geosciences event in Europe, attracting over 11,000 attendees from all over the world, of which more than 25% are students. 

You’ll see in the list below of short courses and papers or posters that Esri is leading or contributing on the SCIENCE of WHERE in a number of areas. This showcases how we are an organization that not only enables great understanding of the world with our products and services, but also performs good science, and contributes well as a member of the scientific community. In addition, we will have an exhibit booth presence (led by Frank Holsmuller) with messaging and a daily schedule of demos featuring:

  • Imagery/Drone2Map
  • the ArcGIS Python API and the R-ArcGIS Bridge
  • Open Data, The Living Atlas, and Story Maps
  • Ecological Marine Units and Hydrology
  • Insights and GeoAnalytical Server

I thank the many colleagues who have worked so hard to make all of this happen, especially Frank, Michael Gould, Guenter Doerffel (Synergis, Esri Austrian distributor), Ionut Sandric and Alexandru Vasile (Esri Romania), and Daniela Wingert and Melanie Brandmeier (Esri Germany). 

 

EGU Short Courses led by Esri

 

Wed, 17:30-19:00, Room -2.16

SC83 - Integrating Multidimensional Scientific Data with ArcGIS

Convener: Ionut Cosmin Sandric  | Co-Convener: Sudhir Shrestha

 

Thu, 17:30-19:00, Room -2.16

SC84 - Visualizing and Analyzing Imagery with ArcGIS

Convener: Alexandru Vasile  | Co-Convener: Ionut Cosmin Sandric

 

EGU Papers/Posters/PICO with Esri Participation

EGU2017-19126

Sentinel-2 ArcGIS Tool for Environmental Monitoring by Alin Plesoianu et al.

Session GI2.3/ESSI2.11/G5.4/NH6.7 Scientific Exploitation of Copernicus Sentinels (co-organized)

Thursday, 27 April 2017, 17:30-19:00, Hall X4

 

EGU2017-18959

Processing UAV data for Digital Terrain Model generation and tree detection by Alin Plesioanu et al.

Session SSS12.6/GI2.13/GM3.9 Unmanned Aerial Systems: Platforms, Sensors and Applications in Soil, Agriculture and Geosciences 

Friday, 28 April 2017, 13:46-13:58, PICO spot 5b

 

EGU2017-18724

Space-time analysis of snow cover change in the Romanian Carpathians (2001-2016) by Dana Micu and Ionut Cosmin Sandric

Session CL4.07/AS1.14/BG9.18/CR1.7/HS11.3 Mountain climates: processes, change and related impacts 

Wednesday, 26 April 2017, 17:30-19:00, Hall X5

 

EGU2017-6051

The Ecological Marine Units Project as a Framework for Collaborative Data Exploration, Distribution, and Knowledge Building by Dawn Wright et al.

Session ESSI1.1 Informatics in Oceanography and Ocean Science

Monday, 24 April 2017, 09:15-09:30, Room L1

 

EGU2017-1729
Space-time patterns in ignimbrite compositions revealed by GIS and R based statistical analysis by Melanie Brandmeier and Gerhard Wörner
Session IE3.2/NP4.3 Big data and machine learning in geosciences (co-organized)

Wednesday, 26 April 2017, 17:30-19:00, Hall X4

Check out EarthXplorers, a great proof-of-concept to help transform K-12 env education http://httpbit.ly/2mVXBuB 

 

A new video (above) describes EarthXplorers, a project of the University of Minnesota's LT Media Lab in partnership with Esri, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and others. EarthXplorers is a successful proof-of-concept that pairs mapping with an online learning environment to support guided project-based learning at the K-12 level. Thanks to David DiBiase and Charlie Fitzpatrick for this info!

As shared by Simon Hill, Federal Government Industry Lead for Esri Australia: "From a tragedy has emerged a small silver lining in the form of increased knowledge of a remote part the Indian Ocean floor. Esri Australia is working closely with Geoscience Australia at the moment to get the vast amounts of data collected made available to the public (via AWS)."

 

Article from the Atlantic: The Search for MH370 Revealed Secrets of the Deep OceanThe Search for MH370 Revealed Secrets of the Deep Ocean

 

Similar articles that appeared this week in Eos, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union are attached.

Esri's online science portfolio has been updated! See the latest at esriurl.com/scicomm.

Announcing the winners of Esri’s first Global Content Challenge ! From August to November we were very pleased to receive nearly ~550 registrations from students in nearly 60 countries, with 70 actual submissions. A distinguished international panel of judges chose the following projects as best exemplifying the spirit of the contest: unleashing the power of Esri’s Living Atlas of the World content through compelling, use-inspired science.

 

LAND

First place ($10,000):  Sara Lubkin, N. Virginia Community College, USA, What Can Beetles Tells Use About Past Climate?

Second place ($5000): Karl Chastko, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, Food, Water and 7 Billion People: Improving Water Efficiency in Agriculture

Third place ($2000): Kayla Wong, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential Based on Soil Properties

Honorable Mention (Esri swag): Danielle Derrick, Carleton University, Canada, A Race for Survival: The Future of Tiger Conservation

 

OCEAN

First place ($10,000):  Alicea Zelesny, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, Antarctica - The Southerly Extreme

Second place ($5000): Julia Portmann, Washington College, Maryland, USA, Attack of the Blobs

Third place ($2000): Kevin Yang, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, Climate Change in Earth's Polar Regions

Honorable Mention (Esri swag): Maggi Klug, University of Alabama-Huntsville, USA, Devastating Effects of Climate Change on Coastal Florida

 

POPULATION

First place ($10,000): Claudia Caceres, Claremont Graduate University, California, USA, Analyzing the Relationship between Climate Change and Food Insecurity in Developing Countries

Second place ($5000): Michael Kirchin, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, The American People

Third place ($2000): Spencer Elford, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, Concrete Jungle: Urban Expansion and the Rise of the Megacity

Honorable Mention (Esri swag): Kathryn Kulbicki, George Mason University, Virginia, USA, Child Welfare in the News August 1, 2016 - October 31, 2016

Honorable Mention (Esri swag): Christopher Koido-Bunt, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, Volcanic Hazard Risk in East and South East Asia

 

We will be featuring these Story Map Journal Apps at the 2017 Esri Federal GIS Conference, the 2017 Esri Education GIS Conference and other events, as well as in various social media outlets. Congratulations!

 

See also the January 2017 ArcWatch article about the contest, and the Directions Magazine feature on the Canadian winners. 

 

A huge thanks to all who participated!

I am pleased to share the lineup of oral talks and posters that will be presented this December at the 2016 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Many know of AGU as among the world’s most well-respected Earth science scholarly organizations, and its annual fall meeting dwarfs our UC by over 10,000 attendees. AGU 2016 expects 24,000 attendees, making it the largest Earth and space science meeting in the world.

You’ll see in the list below of papers, posters and sessions that Esri is leading or contributing on a wide variety of interesting and important projects, many with our federal partners at NASA, NOAA, and the USGS, as well as several universities. This showcases how we are an organization that not only enables great understanding of the world with our products and services, but also performs good science, and contributes well as a member of the scientific community. In addition, we will have a 20' x 20' exhibit booth presence, #623 (led by Research & Sciences Industry Manager Drew Stephens and including Spatial Statistics Product Engineer Kevin Butler and Lead Ocean Content Product Engineer Keith Van Graafeiland) with messaging and demos on multidimensional scientific data and analysis, imagery, big data geoanalytics, The Living Atlas, ArcGIS Pro, Ecological Land Units, Ecological Marine Units, GeoPlanner, Insights, story maps, the web GIS pattern, our commitment to open/interoperable, and more.

I thank the many colleagues who have worked so hard to make all of this happen. All in all, we are sending 13 Esri staff  to participate at AGU, and will share the exhibit booth space with 2 representatives of our long-standing business partner, QPS. 

 

AGU and Related EVENTS/WORKSHOPS with Esri Participation

 

Dawn Wright representing Esri at all-day meeting of NSF-funded OceanObs Research Coordination Network , Sunday, December 11, all day, San Francisco Marriott Marquis, Nob Hill A/C – will be presenting Ecological Marine Units

 

Dawn representing Esri at AGU “Sharing Science in Plain English” panel, Tuesday, December 13, 12:30-2:00, Moscone North 123-124

The panel is a 1.5-hour discussion and Q&A intended for 100-150 scientists with little to no communications experience who want to learn the basics of communicating science effectively to lay audiences, including during media interviews, meetings with policymakers, giving public talks (at civic functions, etc.), or on social media. The target audience member is a graduate student, who has spent the last 7 years studying science and has forgotten how to use more elementary terms to explain his/her research.  However, any Fall Meeting registrant may attend this panel.

 

David DiBiase, Tom Baker, and Esri education contractor Roger Palmer will present a 1.5-hour workshop on ConnectED/GeoInquiries for teachers as part of the joint AGU/National Earth Sciences Teachers Association Geophysical Information For Teachers (GIFT) workshop, Tuesday, December 13, 7:30-3:30, San Francisco Marriott Marquis, Golden Gate A 

 

Dawn representing Esri at AGU “Communicating Your Science: Ask the Experts" panel, Wednesday, December 14, 10:30-12:30, Moscone West 2001A

 

Dawn representing Esri at the Earth Science Women's Network Opportunities Beyond Academia Workshop, Wednesday, December 14, 4:00-6:00, San Francisco Marriott Marquis, Golden Gate B

Thinking about a career outside of academia? It can often be difficult to get help finding a job in a non-profit or government agency, within industry, or as a consultant – after all your advisor is an academic and most likely doesn’t have “first-hand knowledge.” Maybe you want to stay in academia but are interested in working as a consultant or even starting your own business. A panel of scientists with experience outside of academia will share their “lessons learned” and answer your questions about how to find and apply for jobs in policy, federal research labs, state agencies, NGOs, industry, and private enterprise. Geared towards graduate students and post-docs who are considering options outside of academia, as well as faculty who are interested; all are invited. This workshop is a partnership between the Earth Science Women’s Network and AGU Education.

 

Dawn representing Esri at the ENVRIplus Project Workshop, Thursday, December 15, 9:00-2:00, San Francisco Marriott Marquis, Salon 2

This workshop, which is being run as part of the EU-funded ENVRIplus project, aims to identify and explore the barriers that currently exist between research institutes and private companies that prevent them from forming mutually beneficial partnerships. 

 

Dawn representing Esri at an evening scientific storytelling event co-sponsored by AGU and StoryCollider: Springer Nature Storytellers, Thursday, December 15, 8:00-10:00 pm, Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St., San Francisco

 

Sudhir Shrestha is an AGU Earth & Space Science Informatics (ESSI) Outstanding Student Paper Award Coordinator throughout the week.

 

AGU SESSIONS with Esri Participation

 

1: IN51C, IN53E: Spatial Data Infrastructure for Earth and Space Sciences: Analyzing, Visualizing, and Sharing Multidimensional Earth Science Data (Oral and Posters)

Session Description:

Governments and businesses use geospatial data to manage organizational infrastructure, quantify hazard risk, and plan future development. The volume, variety, and complexity of multidimensional scientific data pose challenges with how it is shared with a diverse community, visualized intuitively, or fused for answering scientific questions. Spatial data infrastructure for Earth and Space Sciences is built atop frameworks that support satellite images, airborne data, climate and weather observations, simulations, and forecasts. Such frameworks allow us to manage data, publish metadata, generate science products, and develop tools that support the needs of an end user. This session seeks papers describing operational systems and workflows for deploying multidimensional scientific data for reuse by the broader Earth science community. Topics of interest include: operational systems and best practices for creating and managing geospatial data services, spatial data infrastructure frameworks for processing, analyzing, or visualizing temporal, 3D, 4D Earth science data, and sharing geospatial data.

 

Conveners:

Sudhir R Shrestha, Esri, Redlands, CA, United States

Rahul Ramachandran, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States, 

Manil Maskey, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, United States 

 

INVITED Talk for IN53E: Spatial Data Infrastructure for Earth and Space Sciences: Analyzing, Visualizing, and Sharing Multidimensional Earth Science Data (Oral)

 

52 Million Points and Counting: A New Stratification Approach for
Mapping Global Marine Ecosystems

Dawn J. Wright, Esri

Roger Sayre, USGS; Sean Breyer, Esri; Kevin Butler, Esri; Keith VanGraafeiland, Esri; Kathy Goodin, NatureServe; Maria T. Kavanaugh, WHOI; Mark Costello, U. Auckland; Noel Cressie, U. Wollongong; Zeenatul Basher, USGS; Peter Harris, GRID-Arendal; John Guinotte, USFWS

 

Contributed Talk for IN53E: Spatial Data Infrastructure for Earth and Space Sciences: Analyzing, Visualizing, and Sharing Multidimensional Earth Science Data (Oral)

Dynamic analysis, transformation, dissemination and applications of scientific multidimensional data in ArcGIS Platform

Sudhir R Shrestha, Esri, Redlands, CA, United States

Thomas Collow, Innovim LLC, NOAA; Brett Rose, Esri

 

2. INVITED Introductory Remarks for IN23F: Linking Earth Systems Data to Better Address Societal Challenges: A View of the Earth from the Interior to the Edge of Space Supported by Data to Bring Enhanced Understanding

Part of the lineup for the Inaugural AGU Data Fair 


3: PA21A: Communicating Science Through Data Driven Story Telling (Posters)

Session Description:

Is the Web disrupting communication or just making it more effective? What does our future hold as the Web continues to evolve? How are authors migrating from the static print world of manuscripts, figures, and images into the dynamic world of rich, interactive content? What are some of the best practices being implemented, and how do these approaches facilitate greater engagement, from peers and society at large?

Data driven story telling is changing the way we communicate and share science. In this session, we are seeking papers describing new ways of telling stories that are supported by rich digital and geospatial content. Topics of interest include but not limited to:

  • Best practices for creating and sharing geospatially enabled stories
  • Use cases and story of effective data driven science communication
  • Use cases of data driven applications that supports story telling

 

Conveners:

 

Charles Hobart Perry, USDA Forest Service, Vallejo, CA, United States

Sudhir R Shrestha, Esri, Redlands, CA, United States Dawn J Wright, Esri, Redlands, CA, United States

 

4. IN11E, IN13A: Architecture and Integration Testbed for Earth/Space Science Cyberinfrastructure (Oral and Posters)

Session Description:

Past decades' cyberinfrastructure investments on Earth and Space sciences have accumulated a large amount of assets including data, tools, systems, expertise, and communities for tackling the increasingly complex challenges we are facing today, such as climate change. While these assets have their own specific capabilities, their integration in a cohesive service oriented fashion would enable bigger impact and advance science. Architectural studies, integration and testing are critical steps to foster reuse and integration of existing data and capabilities to address critical science questions that could not be answered before. This session is organized to explore the latest on architecture and testbed development in cyberinfrastructure for Earth/Space sciences such as:

 

1. Existing system architectures for Earth and space systems.

2. Integrating, bridging data systems using novel architectures.

3. System integration and test approaches, environments, and practices.

4. Global and local conceptual architectural studies and solutions.

 

Conveners:

Emily Law, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States

Chaowei Phil Yang, George Mason University Fairfax, Fairfax, VA, United States, 

Jens F Klump, CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering Perth, Perth, WA, Australia

Sudhir R Shrestha, Esri, Redlands, CA, United States

 

 

5. IN52A: Exploiting Big Earth Data: GIS and Beyond I (Oral) and II (Posters)

Session Description:

Developments in GIS, Cloud Computing, Analysis Tools, and HPC enable science communities to accelerate management, modeling, analysis and visualization of large datasets. The demonstration of new technologies in ESIP, EarthCube, and NASA show great promise in creating new analytic capabilities to address critical science questions.

 

GIS tools enable analysis, computing, and visualization, while scaling up using cloud-computing services. Powerful capabilities involving NoSQL, MapReduce, Deep Learning, and compression techniques are being exploited to accelerate data analytics. Combined with new emerging hardware capabilities, scientists are being presented with a significant enhancement in capabilities to address problems of unprecedented size and complexity.

 

This session explores emerging examples of advances in the use of GIS and other tools as applied in big Earth data exploitation. Emphasis will be placed on examples of the application of these technologies into scientists' working environments and the demonstration of the value to Earth science and application users.

 

Conveners:

Daniel Duffy, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States

Michael M Little, NASA Headquarters, Earth Science Technology Office, Washington, DC, United States, Dawn J Wright, Esri, Redlands, CA, United States and Emily Law, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States

 

6. INVITED TALK for IN52A: Exploiting Big Earth Data: GIS and Beyond

The Confluence of GIS, Cloud and Open Source, Enabling Big Raster Data Applications 

Lucian Plesea, Esri

Peter Becker Esri

Carter Burwell Emmart, American Museum of Natural History

Ryan Boller, NASA Goddard

Kathleen Baynes Raytheon

 

7. INVITED TALK for IN12A: Big Data Analytics

Feature Geo Analytics and Big Data Processing: Hybrid Approaches for Earth Science and Real-Time Decision Support

Dawn J. Wright, Esri

Mansour Raad, Erik Hoel, Michael Park, Adam Mollenkopf, Ricardo Trujillo, Esri

 

8. Contributed Talk to PA11D: GEOValue: Addressing best practices for assessing the societal impact and value of geospatial information based on use cases

 

The Role of Content Aggregators In GEOValue

Dawn J. Wright, Esri

Sean Breyer, Marten Hogeweg, Jeanne Foust, Lawrie Jordan, Esri; Gordon Plunkett, Esri Canada

 

9. INVITED PANELIST for IN13E: Exploring Value in our Research Products: Approaches to Assessment of Research Products Such as Data Sets, Metadata, and Research Software within a Policy Framework that Supports Scalable, Reusable, Sustainable, and Open-Access Outcomes for Research and Societal Benefit

Innovation Balanced with Community Collaboration, ESIP

Christine E. White, Esri

 

In addition, Esri is pleased to support and recommend these AGU Data Skills, Data Management and Reproducibility Town Halls, co-sponsored by our friends at the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), as well as an evening December 14th show for AGU attendees at the Morrison Planetarium of the California Academy of Sciences

Also appearing in Esri Insider...

 

Last week President Obama hosted the first-ever White House Frontiers Conference in Pittsburgh, an event co-hosted by the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. Esri was among many of America’s leading innovators invited to come together to discuss how we can empower people through science, technology, and innovation to lead our communities, our country, and our world in the future. There were five “frontiers” of innovation that kicked off the conference in five separate tracks: personal, local, national, global, and interplanetary.

 

Within the Global Frontiers Track, I was asked to lead off the subsection entitled Climate Information, Tools and Services for Enhancing Resilience. In my remarks (downloadable at esriurl.com/frontiers), I sought to give a broad perspective on how scientists and managers think about and visualize the world for on-the-ground resilience to climate change, what innovative partnerships and opportunities are in this space (including the participation of Esri and others in the President’s Climate Action Plan and Climate Data Initiative), and what is some of the cutting edge in moving the field forward. This set the stage for three lightning talks expanding further on this theme, by our colleague Jed Sundwall, Global Open Data Lead of Amazon Web Services, Brooke Runnette, new Executive Vice President and Chief Exploration & Impact Officer of the National Geographic, and Laur Hess Fischer, Project Manager of Climate CoLab at MIT. Laur and her Climate CoLab group is also in partnership with our colleagues at the American Geophysical Union within its Thriving Earth Exchange for connecting local decision makers with the science needed to optimize community (geo)designs and plans.

 

The track concluded with interactive breakouts and visioning discussions about what the country might look like in 2100. Esri Government Strategist Pat Cummens participated in an urban planning charette. I was in a more traditional breakout on climate data and information that focused on: (1) what science based tools are currently available to support local climate resilience planning; (2) How can we better use visualization tools and technologies at the local level, engaging as many citizens as possible in the process; and (3) Where are the gaps in connecting scientists and decision makers at the local level?

 

At the plenary session that brought the conference to an exciting conclusion, President Obama himself highlighted the progress that his Administration has made on his inaugural pledge to "restore science to its rightful place," while also focusing on the future and what can be made possible through science and technology. The President emphasized how investing in science and technology can help develop new jobs and industries, new discoveries that improve lives, and "that innovation is in our nation’s DNA." His comments are further amplified in a special issue of Wired magazine, that includes his thoughts on artificial intelligence, self-driving cars in smart cities, precision medicine, and more. See also his to-do list for the tech industry, including how to make it easier for citizens to participate in their own government via “data-rich environments.” For more information on the event see:

New Esri Insider blog post on today's announcement of new release of high-resolution Alaska DEMs as first deliverable of ArcticDEM project. Great story maps too! 

 

https://blogs.esri.com/esri/esri-insider/2016/09/06/gis-makes-the-picture-clearer-on-climate-change/ 

Esri is running an exciting new contest that opens THIS MONTH, called the Global Content Challenge.

 

Esri is challenging students all over the world to unleash the power of Esri content by way of their own geographic analyses, visualizations, predictive models and more to tell a compelling scientific story. The story must be presented using the Esri Story Map Journal app. We will point contestants to the best of our data and our map journal tips and tricks. They do the rest! Judges will select the best map journals to be awarded prizes. Esri will also share the winning map journals on our Collaborative Resource Portal and feature them at Esri’s Federal GIS and Education User Conferences, as well as Young Professionals Network events.

 

Esri's Global Content Challenge is open to undergraduate or graduate students at colleges or universities, as well as US high school students enrolled in an Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography or Environmental Science course. To be clear, for undergraduate and graduate students you must be currently enrolled in a college or university program anywhere in the world. If you have already graduated you are not eligible. For high school students, this contest is only open to high school students in the United States and only to those students currently enrolled in an AP Human Geography or Environmental Science course within their US high school.

 

Students! Get creative by using Esri's land, ocean, and population premium content libraries to tell compelling stories that bring about understanding and action.

 

Prizes:

There will be winners in each of three categories (land, ocean, and population) who will receive:

First Place: $10,000 or software equivalent

Second Place: $5,000 or software equivalent

Third Place: $2,000 or software equivalent

 

Key Dates:

August 29, 2016 ---> Competition opens

November 11, 2016  ---> Competition closes at 5:00 PM (PDT)

December 5, 2016  ---> Winners announced

 

Questions may be directed to contentchallenge@esri.com

Scientists Gather at Esri UC to Discuss the Impact of GIS in Future and Present Challenges

 

See more on Esri Insider, Inaugural Esri Science Symposium Crystallizes Community | Esri Insider

Esri Global Content Challenge!

Esri is challenging students all over the world to unleash the power of Esri content by way of their own geographic analyses, visualizations, predictive models and more to tell a compelling scientific story. The story must be presented using the Esri map journal app. We'll point you to the best of our data and our map journal tips and tricks. You do the rest! Judges will select the best map journals to be awarded prizes. Esri will also share the winning map journals on our Collaborative Resource Portal and feature them at Esri’s Federal GIS and Education User Conferences, and Young Professionals Network events.

 

Esri's Global Content Challenge is open to undergraduate or graduate students at colleges or universities, as well as high school students enrolled in an Advanced Placement Human Geography course. Get creative by using Esri's land, ocean, and population premium content libraries to tell compelling stories that bring about understanding and action.

 

Prizes:

There will be winners in each of three categories (land, ocean, and population) who will receive:

First Place: $10,000 or software equivalent

Second Place: $5,000 or software equivalent

Third Place: $2,000 or software equivalent

 

Key Dates:

August 29, 2016                  Competition opens

November 11, 2016            Competition closes at 5:00 PM (PDT)

December 5, 2016                         Winners announced

 

Many thanks to those of you who attended or expressed interest in our first ever Esri Science Symposium as part of both the UC and the GIS Education conferences. Your presence and participation made for a very stimulating and enjoyable time. Here are some resources to visit:

Next year we will field a new GIScience panel to respond to a new domain science keynote which will be delivered by Jon Foley, Executive Director of the California Academy of Sciences, possibly in tandem with his new Chief of Science, Shannon Bennett.

 

 

 

 

Special keynote address, discussion panel, and reception to engage and enlighten scientists

A special Science Symposium will be held in conjunction with the 2016 Esri Education GIS Conference (EdUC) and Esri User Conference (UC). The Science Symposium will include:

  • A keynote address by Margaret Leinen, Director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, current president of the American Geophysical Union, and a US State Department Science Envoy.

Margaret Leinen, Director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, will deliver the keynote address at the 2016 Esri Science Symposium.

  • A conversational reaction panel moderated by Mike Goodchild (UCSB emeritus) with John Wilson (USC), Marco Painho (U. Nova de Lisboa), Ming Tsou (San Diego State), and Cyrus Shahabi (USC).
  • Audience Q/A and discussion.
  • Networking reception: Enjoy stunning views of the San Diego Harbor, delicious appetizers, and a hosted bar of beer, wine, soft drinks, and bottled water.

This new event at the UC and EdUC seeks to “broaden the tent” of participation beyond the traditional geographers and GIScientists, to those working in the domain sciences (e.g., ocean science, hydrology, ecology, forestry, climate science, geology/geophysics, agricultural science, conservation biology, sustainability science and/or geodesign, health sciences, and the social sciences). A further aim is to strengthen the links between Esri and the scientific community while (re)crystallizing a community of scientists at the UC normally scattered throughout the week in disparate sessions.

The event will be held Tuesday, June 28 from 3:15-5:30 pm in the Marriott Marina Salons F and G and is open to registered attendees of both the EdUC and UC. For more information contact Esri Chief Scientist Dawn Wright.

We look forward to seeing you in San Diego this June!

Winter is upon us and the best OCEAN models show that this year's El Nino (now in progress) will be one of the biggest in recent memory. Weather and climate are indeed having a bigger and more substantial impact on everyone. Once again, we should not wait for people to ask if GIS can help. There are two new Esri Press books to proactively share insights and practical solutions with your fellow GIS users, to help them visualize, analyze, and mitigate against the impacts of ocean, weather, and climate.

 

Please check out:

Ocean Solutions, Earth Solutions (including Chapter 5 on how El Nino - which starts in the Pacific Ocean - and similar climate impacts affect us all, and globally)

https://medium.com/@Esri/ocean-solutions-earth-solutions-bcc97c1d235b#.3gfokth0s

 

Mapping and Modeling Weather and Climate with GIS

http://esripress.esri.com/display/index.cfm?fuseaction=display&websiteID=271&moduleID=0

 

Neither of these books are just a science textbook or heavy-duty technical manual. They are both designed to be practical, insightful guidebooks for many different audiences. They both include Python scripts to give readers a starting point in their GIS work. Ocean Solutions... also includes a separate online gallery of additional scripts, data sets, map packages, story maps, and videos to further aid the reader

http://esripress.esri.com/bookresources/index.cfm?event=catalog.book&id=14